Friday, December 24, 2010

Increased intestinal permeability may lead directly to increased hunger, and a higher bodyfat setpoint.

In yesterday's Part 3 in the Body Fat Setpoint series, Stephan lays out his theory about how leptin resistance occurs, and how that affect out body fat setpoint. It's a little bit dense, so I decided to summarize it to the best of my ability here, as well as incorporate some of my own thoughts:


  • Increased intestinal permeability allows inflammatory substances, such as LPS* (lipopolysaccharide), to cross the gut barrier into our body.
  • The inflammatory substances irritate many tissues, including the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus is the main site of leptin's action. Leptin is a hormone which causes increases in energy expenditure and reduced appetite.
  • Irritation of the hypothalamus causes it to become leptin resistant, which means that the energy-increasing/appetite-suppressing effects of leptin are blocked. We get more tired and hungry.
  • There are many things that are known to increase gut permeability: gluten, lectins from grains, legumes, and nightshades(tomato/potato/eggplant), certain substances in dairy, alcohol, capsaicin(hot peppers), saponins, abnormal gut flora, omega 3:6 imbalance, and much more.
  • A paleo diet eliminates nearly all of these offending substances, which helps improve gut barrier integrity.



*Lipopolysaccharide is produced by gram-negative bacteria, and is one of the main component that the immune system uses to recognize these pathogens. LPS causes a strong activation of the immune system.

Body Fat Setpoint by Stephan Guyenet

Hey guys, I hope you're all having a great winter break! I just wanted to share with you a series of articles, written by a fellow husky! He is a graduate student who received his Ph.D in neurobiology from the UW in 2009.

His name is Stephan Guyenet, and he is the writer of Whole Health Source. His posts are some of the most thought-provoking and interesting that I have read, and he takes a very objective and scientific approach to health, all while keeping posts readable and interesting.

Below is a series in which Stephan discusses the concept of our body's set point, what might affect it, and how to change it. I hope you guys read and enjoy it.

I wish you all a Merry Christmas!

Body Fat Setpoint
Body Fat Setpoint Part 2: Mechanisms of Fat Gain
Body Fat Setpoint Part 3: Dietary Causes of Obesity
Body Fat Setpoint Part 4: Changing the Setpoint

Sunday, December 12, 2010

Finals Week/Winter Break WODs

Hey guys, we won't be having training this week due to finals. Study hard, ace your finals, and have an amazing Winter Break! Enjoy the time off, but try to stay active, don't let all of your hard-earned progress go to waste just because you're not going to classes for two weeks.

To help you stay active over the break, here are some WODs that require no equipment, and can be done anywhere! There are also some more WODs at the end that require some basic equipment such as a pullup bar, dumbells, or jump rope. If you don't have a timer, don't worry about it, just do it as fast as you can! Do a workout every other day or so

100 Burpees for time.
                                                   


3 rds for time of:
50 Squats
400m Run
                                                  
For time:
100 Pushups
100 Situps
100 Squats
                                                  


AMRAP in 10 min of:
10 Broad Jumps
Run 100m
                                                  


3 rounds for time of:
25 Situps
25 Squats
25 Pushups
25 Lunges
                                                 

AMRAP in 10 min of:
5 Pullups
10 Pushups
15 Squats
                                                


With dumbells you think you could do about 30 cleans (ground to shoulder) straight with...

21-15-9 reps for time of:
DB Clean and Jerks (ground to overhead)
Burpees
                                               


100 Man-Makers* for time w/ light weight (10-20lb DBs)

*How to do a Man-Maker
                                               


"Annie"
50-40-30-20-10 reps of:
Double-Unders*
Situps

*(If you can't do double-unders, do 150-120-90-60-30 singles with a jump rope instead, leaving situps as is.)

Don't be afraid to modify these workouts, or make up your own! Just get to it!

Wednesday, December 8, 2010

Wednesday WOD

Strength WOD
Deadlift - Work up to a one rep max.

WOD
5 rounds for time of:
10 Burpees
10 Medicine Ball Cleans (20#)

MWOD
Thoracic Myofascial Release - 4 min
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side
Couch Stretch - 1 min/side

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Tuesday WOD

Strength WOD
Press - Work up to a one rep max.
Pullups - Max reps in a single set.

WOD
For time:
Run 1 mile.

MWOD
Calf Stretch - 2 min/side
Psoas MF Release - 1 min/side
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side

Monday WOD

Strength WOD
Back Squat - Work up to a one rep max.

WOD
21-15-9 for time of:
Burpees
KB Swings (55lb)

MWOD
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side
Hamstring Stretch - 1 min/side
Pigeon Pose - 2 min/side

Thursday, December 2, 2010

Thursday WOD

Skill Practice
Hang Power Cleans

WOD
AMRAP in 12 min of:
250m Row
20 DB Presses (35# DB's)

MWOD
Thoracic MF Release - 2 min/side
Psoas MF Release - 1 min/side
Pigeon Pose - 2 min/side

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Tuesday WOD - Blair Morrison on Fitness, Character, and Failure

Please read this free article from the CrossFit Journal by Blair Morrison. He provides some great insight and wisdom that can benefit anyone.

Blair Morrison on Fitness, Character, and Failure


Strength WOD
3 X 5 Press
3 X 80% Max Rep Pullups

WOD
6 rounds for times of:
1 Lap (~180m)
2:00 Rest

MWOD
Calf Stretch - 2 min/side
Psoas MF Release - 1 min/side
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side

Monday, November 29, 2010

Monday WOD

Welcome back! I hope you all had a great Thanksgiving and are all rested up and ready to hit it hard again! Only two and a half weeks or so until Winter Break, so give it your all!


Strength WOD
3 X 5 Front Squat

WOD
3 rounds for time of:
2 rds of Cindy (5 Pullups, 10 Pushups, 15 Squats)
5 Clean and Push-Press (135#)

MWOD
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side
Pigeon Pose - 1 min/side

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Tuesday WOD - Snow Day





Strength WOD
Build the biggest snowman possible in 1 hour.

WOD
AMRAP in 4 hours:
Sled 100m
Throw 20 Snowballs
10 Snow Angels

MWOD
Stretch out in a warm blanket, or in front of a warm fire, with a good book, and enjoy a hot cup of coffee, cocoa, or spiced cider. :)

Enjoy your snow day, and have an amazing Thanksgiving!

Monday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Back Squat

WOD
AMRAP in 8 min of:
250m Row
80 ft Walking Lunges w/ 45# plate overhead

MWOD
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side
Pigeon Pose - 1 min/side

Thursday, November 18, 2010

Thursday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Bench Press
3 X 80% Max Rep Pullups

WOD
6 rds for times of:
Sprint 1 Lap (~190m)
Rest 2:00

Time each sprint and add up times at the end.

MWOD
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side
Psoas MF Release - 1 min/side
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side

Wednesday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Deadlift
3 X 5 AMRAP Strict TTB's

WOD
21-15-9 of:
Burpees
Situps
DB Clean and Jerks (35# DBs)

MWOD
Paleo Chair - 4 min
Hip Capsule Work - 1 min/side
Pigeon Pose - 2 min/side

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

Tuesday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Push Jerk
3 X 80% Max Rep Pullups

WOD
5 rounds for time of:
5 Pullups(strict)
10 Pistols
15 Pushups

MWOD
Overhead Shoulder Mobility - 3 min
Paleo Chair - 3 min
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side

Monday, November 15, 2010

Monday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Front Squat

WOD
AMRAP in 8 min of:
4 DB Presses (50# DBs)
8 KB Swings (50#)
12 GHD Situps

MWOD
Paleo Chair - 6 min
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side

Tuesday, November 9, 2010

Tuesday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Press

WOD
4 rds for reps of:
1:00 Tabata Squats
1:00 Tabata Pushups

MWOD
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side
Paleo Chair - 2 min

Monday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Back Squat

WOD
AMRAP in 8 min of:
15 DB Thrusters (35#)
15 Pullups or Ring Rows

MWOD
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side
Overhead Shoulder Mobilization - 2 min/side
Hamstring Stretch - 1 min/side

Wednesday, November 3, 2010

Wednesday WOD

Strength WOD
Deadlift 3 X 5
Between sets, complete 10 strict Toes-To-Bar, no kip, smooth movement.

WOD
5 rounds for time of:
10 DB Push Press (30# DB's)
10 Windmills (30#)
10 Burpees

MWOD
Paleo Chair - 2 min
Mobilize Overhead Shoulder Position - 2 min/side
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side

Monday, November 1, 2010

Tuesday WOD

Strength WOD
Bench Press 3 X 5
Press 3 X 5

WOD
5 rds for time of:
Run 2 laps
2:00 rest

MWOD
Psoas MF Release w/lacrosse ball - 1 min/side
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side
Calf Stretch - 2 min/side

Sunday, October 31, 2010

Monday WOD

Strength WOD
Back Squat 3 X 5

WOD
Tabata Squats
alternated with (1 min, then switch)
Tabata Lunges

MWOD
Badass Pigeon - 2 min/leg
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/leg
Calf Stretch - 1 min/leg

Thursday, October 28, 2010

Thursday WOD - Form Matters...

Here is a great post from CrossFit Charlottesville that explains why form is so important. There is so much truth in this article, and I hope you will all read it.

Form Matters - Do It Right or Don't Do It At All

WOD
AMRAP in 8 min of:
10 Pushups
10 Russian Twists (25lb plate, 10 per side)
10 Ring Rows

MWOD
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side
Calf Stretch - 2 min/side
Overhead Shoulder Stretch - 2 min/side - Like this ---> MobilityWOD

Wednesday, October 27, 2010

Wednesday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Deadlift
3 X 10 Strict Toes-to-Bars

WOD
Tabata Row (for calories)
30 sec rest (to get off of rower)
AMRAP Situps in 3:00

Score is total calories plus half the number of situps completed. Post scores to comments!

MWOD
Hip Capsule Work  - 2 min/side - On soft surface on hands and knees, place most of the weight onto one knee and try to stick your femur out through your butt. Free style with it a bit, moving your hips to both sides, finding where there is restriction and focusing there; don't let your pelvis rotate down though, keep it horizontal.
Hamstring Stretch - 4 min/side - Exploring the inside and outside, see what's tightest, and work there.

Monday, October 25, 2010

Tuesday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Press
3 X 80% Max Rep Pullups

WOD
6 X 200m Sprints
2:00 Rest between efforts

MWOD
Psoas MF Release - 1 min/side
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/side
Couch Stretch - 2 min/side

Sunday, October 24, 2010

Monday WOD - Banana peels, plant defenses, and saponins...

How saponins destroy cell membranes.

So what do banana peels and saponins have to do with health or peformance? Well bananas are surely a delicious way to get some carbs after a tough workout, but there are surely better choices like yams, sweet potatoes, and other tubers, right? But why are we talking about their peels, and what the heck are saponins?

Banana peels offer a great example of how plants have evolved chemical protection mechanisms for lack of physical protection(plants can't run away from animals, and they can't fight back physically, except for thorns and such).

On ThePaleoDiet.com, a reader stumbled upon the nutrient content of banana peels, was amazed at the rich nutrient profile, and posed a question asking for more information about the nutrition of banana peels.

At first glance, it looks like banana peels are the holy grail of nutrient density, eating only 50g of banana peel would provide you with 3900mg of potassium(110% RDA), 1200mg of sodium, 30 mg of iron(200%), 960mg of calcium(80%), and 3800mg of manganese(78,000%).


Sounds great right? To paraphrase from Dr. Cordain's response, however: the devil is in the details. The banana peel serves to protect the fruit from physical damage, and more importantly, from predators (birds, mammals, insects, etc) and pathogens (fungi, bacteria, etc).

The banana inside contains the reproductive material, it's seeds, which have to eventually make it into the ground intact and unharmed, so that they can produce offspring of the original plant. If the seeds are destroyed, then the banana plant could not reproduce, and would become extinct. However, the banana plant, as all other plants, has developed an evolutionary strategy involving chemical defense that allows it to survive and reproduce.

Banana peels contain a number of toxic substances to ward off predation and infection by bacteria and fungi. These substances are called antinutrients, and we have touched on a few of them in particular in the past, such as phytate, and lectins. Here's a new one though that banana peels, as well as legumes, potatoes and other nightshades, and grains contain in high quantities: Saponins.

Saponins are a class of compounds that have a lipid-soluble side, and a water-soluble side, giving them unique characteristics. They derive their name from their tendency to produce soap-like foaming when mixed with water. They are often bitter, and act in many ways to deter plant predation. What gives banana peels the bitter taste is that they contain 8 times the safe concentration limit of saponins (24mg/g).

Saponins also have toxic effects on ALL cells. They cause the membranes of all living cells to breakdown, killing the cells. If saponins are consumed in large enough quantities, saponins rapidly breakdown the cells lining the intestine, and enter blood circulation where they can destroy the membranes of red blood cells, which can cause death.

This is not simple theory either, in experiments with animals, even low doses of banana peel extract added to their normal food caused damage to their red and white blood cells, severely impaired growth, and strongly inhibited the production of thyroid hormone, necessary for a healthy metabolic rate.

To sum it up: Don't eat your banana peels, and don't eat grains or legumes either.


Strength WOD
3 X 5 Front Squat

WOD
15-12-9 of:
DB Clean & Jerk (50lb DB's)
Burpees

MWOD
Wide Squat Stretch - 2 min
Calf Stretch - 2 min/leg
Hamstring Stretch - 2 min/leg

Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Wednesday WOD

Strength WOD
Deadlift 3 X 5
3 X Max L-Sit

WOD
AMRAP in 3 min of:
10 Hollow Rocks or V-Ups
10 Pushups
Rest 2 min
Row as far as possible in 3:00.

MWOD
Keg Drill w/foam roller - 2 min
Wide Squat Drill - 2 min
Hip Myofascial Release w/lacrosse ball - 2 min/side
Calf Myofascial Release w/lacrosse ball or partner - 1min/side

Monday, October 18, 2010

Tuesday WOD - Why Squat?

Why we squat...


Strength WOD
3 X 5 Push Jerk
3 X 80% Max Rep Pullups

WOD
3 rounds for time of:
10 Broad Jumps
20 Walking Lunges
30 Squats

MWOD
Couch Stretch - 2 min/leg
External Hip Rotation 1 min/leg
Paleo Chair - 4 min

Sunday, October 17, 2010

Monday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Back Squat

WOD

3 rounds for reps of:
AMRAP in 2 minutes of:
10 Situps
10 Squats
10 Pushups
Rest 1 min

MWOD
Hamstring Stretch - 2min/leg Contract-Relax
External Hip Rotation - 3 min/leg Contract-Relax

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Thursday WOD

Today, we'll be skipping the Strength WOD so we can work on mobility work longer after the WOD.

WOD
We'll be running on the track above the IMA today. We will run from one corner, to the next, doing 10-1 descending Burpees at each corner.
Example:
Run
10 Burpees
Run
9 Burpees
Run....

MWOD
Test: Squat with hands together overhead, as high as possible

Stretch Hip flexion and knee extension (hamstrings) 2 min / leg
Wide Squat Hip Mobility 2 min
Psoas MF Release 1 min/side
Stretch Foot Dorsiflexion (calf) 2 min/ leg
Couch Stretch - 2 min/leg

Retest: Squat with overhead hand reach

Wednesday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Deadlift

WOD
Hang Power Clean to Front Squat Ladder
Pick a weight that is around 2/3 your one rep max (or estimated max). Perform 1 rep the first minute, 2 reps the second, and on until failure to complete required reps within one minute.

MWOD
Couch Stretch -2 min per side
Paleo Chair - 6 min.

Monday, October 11, 2010

Tuesday WOD

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Push Press

WOD
6 X 200m Sprints

MWOD
4 Minutes in Paleo Chair
2 min Thoracic Spine Mobilization with Lacrosse ball per side
1 min Psoas mobilizing each side

Sunday, October 10, 2010

Monday WOD - Thruster Heaven

Strength WOD
3 X 5 Front Squat

WOD
AMRAP in 7 minutes of:
DB Thrusters (35lb DBs)

MWOD
2 min Front Rack Stretch/side
1 minute Freestyling hip mobility (ala pigeon pose on box/bench), then 2 minutes contract-relax bellybutton over foot, each hip (3 min/hip).

Saturday, October 9, 2010

Get comfortable with uncomfortable...



Greg Glassman, founder of CrossFit, once said that "The greatest adaptation to CrossFit takes place between the ears."

Intensity has been shown as the single independent variable most associated with positive adaptations to training, and CrossFit supplies plenty of it. Or does it?

CrossFit provides the opportunity for you to push yourself to your own limits and past. The work however, is in your hands, to continually push harder, endure more pain, and push past the urge to quit, to slow down, to set that bar down and take a breather.

Intensity hurts, even a newbie to CrossFit can tell you that. But it is in the most painful moments of a workout, when your lungs are burning, when your muscles are on fire, and you feel like you're suffocating, that the greatest benefit of CrossFit training is borne.

The pain of intensity is unlike any other pain. It's not like a headache from which you cannot escape, it's not the pain of a broken bone, it is one the athlete themselves have created, and are sustaining themselves. It's a pain that you could easily end by quitting, by giving up and laying down. However, it is this unique quality that builds the resolution, determinedness, and mental strength in those individuals that make up their minds to keep pushing.

CrossFit training develops the ability to get comfortable with pain, with the uncomfortable.

So the next time you are in the darkest part of your workout, when you feel like you're suffocating, like your entire body is on fire, and everything in the world says you should stop, remember, and tell yourself:

"This is the moment I become stronger."


Then pick up that weight again and refuse to quit! This is CrossFit at it's best, and it is a truly awe-inspiring moment, whether it occurs during a two minute Fran, or a fifteen minute one.

Wednesday, October 6, 2010

Thursday WOD - Money in the bank...

I'd like to compare training and performance to buying a car. Stay with me here for a sec, alright, this actually makes some sense.

I like to think of everything we do outside of the training itself as deposits in a bank. You do some foam rolling, there's some cash, eat right, big deposit in your account, make sure you get plenty of sleep and avoid stress, big bonus check from the boss.

Now, training is where you spend the money. A great training program is like finding a great quality car at a decent price, a lot of bang for your buck, you'll get great results for the effort put in. A ill-prepared program is like finding a slightly used car at a new car price, not a lot of value there, and a lot of effort wasted.

Now, if you don't invest in your account, by doing the right stuff such as sleeping, stretching, mobility work, minimizing stress, and taking care of everything else outside of training, you won't be able to afford the great results even if you find the great deal/program.

So my challenge to you is: How much money can you put in the bank?




Alright, my rant's over, to la entraĆ®nement!


Strength WOD
3 X 5 Bench Press


WOD
AMRAP in 2 min of:
Burpees


Rest 2 min


AMRAP in 2 min of
10 Pushups Unbroken
10 KB Swings Unbroken


Rest 2 min


Row as far as possible in 2 min.


MWOD
Squat - 6 min
Couch Stretch - 4 min (2min/side)

Wednesday WOD

Strength WOD
Deadlift 3 X 5

WOD
5 rds for time of:
10 DB Push Press (35#/20#)
10 Windmills (35#/20#, 5/side)
10 Burpees

MWOD
6 min in Squat position
4 min Couch Stretch (2 min/leg, freestyling)

Monday, October 4, 2010

Tuesday WOD - Releasing your parking brake...

Let's talk about muscles and fascia. Each muscle in your body is encased in a sheath of fibrous tissue called fascia. In a perfect situation, the layers of fascia allow muscles to slide easily over each other without any restriction. The layers of fascia are interconnected throughout your body, uninterrupted from head to toe, so tightness in one area can show up in other places. 

However, nearly none of us live in this perfect condition. Every night, when you sleep, or even for periods of time in which you don't move for a long time (airplanes, car rides, etc), tiny fibers develop between your muscles and fascia, taking away that perfect gliding action. Hard training actually accelerates this process of this "fuzz" generation.


Gill Hedley provides a great visual to explain this phenomenon.

So why does this matter?

Well, the increased friction in your muscles means you have to work harder to get the same amount of work done. It also will hinder your flexibility, and therefore your ability to get into the proper positions and express your power effectively. After a while, it can also hurt! You know those knots you get in muscles? Those are adhesions in the myofascial tissue. Your body is a Corvette, and we need to take off these parking brakes!

So what's a brother to do?
Let me introduce you to the humble lacrosse ball. It may not look like much, but it can be a vicious enemy and admirable friend at the same time. It's like that brutally honest friend that gives you the kick in the pants you need to do what you know you should.

The lacrosse ball is a very useful tool in myofascial release, or working out the fuzz. There are many ways in which it can be used, but the generally principle is:
1. Find where you're tight
2. Stick the ball there
3. Roll around on it
4. Don't make a private face...you'll know what I mean.

By rolling around on the lacrosse ball, you are gradually breaking up adhesions in the myofascial tissues, and this will be painful, especially at first. Most people are much tighter than they know and should start slowly and somewhat gently. 

Another technique that is rather useful for working on a concentrated adhesion (knot) is:
1. With the ball on the knot, contract that muscle hard for 5 seconds
2. Relax for 10 seconds
3. Repeat 6 times, or until adhesion is broken up.



Strength WOD
Alternating:
Press 3 X 5
Rest 90 seconds
3 X 75% Max Rep Strict Pullups or 3 X 10 Ring Rows (Example: If your max is 20 pullups, you will attempt to do 15 for each set)
Rest 90 Seconds

WOD
3 rounds for time of:
20 Squat Jumps
20 seconds L-Sit or 30 Laying Leg Raises
10 Pullups or Ring Rows

MWOD
Thoracic Spine Mobilization w/lacrosse ball(4 min per side)
Psoas Myofascial Release w/lacrosse ball(1 min per side)

Sunday, October 3, 2010

Monday WOD - The beginning of a new era...

An overview of the squat, specifically the Front Squat, High-Bar Back Squat, and Low-Bar Back Squat


Welcome back performance junkies! It's the first WOD of the new school year! The workout below will be likely the new format for the foreseeable future. I understand that is may take some time to get used to, and the training sessions may run slightly longer at first, but you will reap the benefits from smarter training. My understanding and knowledge of training, nutrition, performance, etc is always evolving and expanding, as should yours.

To start off the new training year, at the bottom of this post is a clip with some advice that you would be smart to apply to not only your workouts, but to the rest of your life as well, anytime you are faced with a difficult situation. Try it out next time you want to quit during a tough workout, tell yourself that you're going to keep going, that you're gonna get this next rep. I think you'll be surprised at how much of your limitations are in your head.


Strength WOD
3 X 5 Back Squat

WOD
Tabata Squats
Tabata Pushups

MWOD
Couch Stretch (4 min each leg)

The Greatest Adaptation

Tuesday, September 28, 2010

New year, new training!

Welcome back fellow Husky CrossFitters!

I hope you're ready to start training, because we'll be having our first class of the new year this Monday, October 4th. Like last year, we'll be meeting down at the IMA, at the bottom of the stairs just past the card checker. Please, invite your friends!

The new class time will be at 5:30pm Monday-Thursday.

This year, we'll be doing things a tad bit differently, but for good reason. This year, we'll be incorporating a lot more dedicated strength training, along with more mobility work. The mobility work will include teaching you guys how to stay nimble on your own, because you have 23 hours in the rest of the day which influence your health and performance a great deal.

I'm hoping to organize some fun stuff for us this year, so make sure you don't miss out!

Monday, September 13, 2010

The Paleo Solution by Robb Wolf


Hey guys, I just wanted to remind you that Robb Wolf's new book, The Paleo Solution will be released on the 16th. Robb Wolf has been providing the Paleo and CrossFit communities with easy access to great information over the years, and his new book promises to offer the same quality. He covers not only nutrition, but also training, sleep, supplements, specific illnesses, and more. This is a must-have for anyone trying to optimize their performance, or anyone competing in sport of any kind. It also makes a great present for family members with health issues, or fellow athletes!

Sunday, August 29, 2010

The next blog you NEED to add to your daily "to-do list"

K-STARR

Kelly Starrett, the San Franciscan king of pain, misery, and performance-enhancing mobility work, has created something that will help EVERY SINGLE athlete out there. He has created the MOBILITY WOD! This is a short mobility routine, that is posted every day. Every day it's new, and he will systematically work through and correct your tight and wonky business. Check it out. Put a shortcut to it. Hell, make it your internet browser's main page! STRETCH YOUR STUFF!

Mobility WOD

Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Smoking Candy Cigarettes



All those recipes for "paleo pancakes", "paleo cupcakes", and "paleo bread" seem great right? Or are we really just fooling ourselves by sprinkling sugar on crap, metaphorically speaking. Paleonu blogger Kurt Harris has a good article that addresses the act of making neolithic foods "paleo". Perhaps we should rethink recreating those foods we used to crave so much, or at least save them for special occasions such as birthdays and weddings. Check it out.

Smoking Candy Cigarettes by Kurt Harris

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Great resource for nutrition and health!

Hey guys, sorry it's been so long. I've recently stumbled upon a incredibly useful collection of blogs and websites and knew I had to share it! It covers many categories, from Paleo to Weston A. Price nutrition perspectives, to food activism, miscellaneous and local resource info sites. The page details each category, as well as gives a brief description of each website or blog. This is definitely a page to bookmark!


Eat This: The Ultimate Food Resource Guide

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Getting Back to Nature - Natural Movements

Here is a great video by The Strength Box, which demonstrates some fun and playful movements. One thing we don't get enough of as adults is PLAY. How often do you just go and climb around  and crawl around on stuff? Trees, walls, hedges, stuff we used to climb all the time as kids. Our society seems to discourage this kind of behavior in adults these days, but why? Playing is good for your mind AND body, you get to have fun while building capacity in balance, coordination, and agility, three oft-neglected areas of fitness. So get out there, rebel against society's ignorance, and climb a tree, explore the outdoors, and play like you used to when you were a kid! But most importantly, HAVE FUN!

Monday, July 5, 2010

Nutrition Series: The Basics - Lipoproteins

Here is the next installment of the Nutrition Series! It may help to revisit the last post in this series, about cholesterol. This one explains a bit about how lipids are carried around in our bodies, and with topics like HDL and LDL abounding in the media, it can be beneficial to know a bit about these hard working molecules that have been indiscriminately labeled good and bad, respectively.


THE BASICS - LIPOPROTEINS

A chylomicron; ApoA, B, C, and E are apolipoproteins, T (Triacylglycerol)C (Cholesterol); green (Phospholipids)

Lipoproteins are complexes of phospholipids and apolipoproteins, as shown in the picture above. Lipoproteins play a hugely important role in the body, by facilitating the transport of non-water soluble triglycerides, cholesterol, and cholesterol esters in the aqueous(water based) environment of our bloodstream. These lipoprotein particles are classified by their density and size, with larger and less dense lipoproteins consisting of more fat than protein. Some of the largest particles may be up to 200 times the size of the smallest ones, but even the the largest, chylomicrons, can only be about 1/20th the width of the thinnest human hair.

Here are the various classifications of lipoproteins, in order from largest/least dense to smallest/most dense:

Chylomicrons are created by the enterocytes in the small intestine. Enterocytes function to absorb nutrients from the gastrointestinal tract. Chylomicrons carry exogenous(created outside the body) sources of lipids, absorbed by enterocytes, to the liver, heart, adipocytes(fat storage cells), and skeletal muscles. After they’ve unloaded their contents, the remnants of these particles are recycled by the liver into VLDL.

(VLDL) Very Low Density Lipoprotein particles are created by the liver and carry endogenous(created within the body) products to peripheral tissues. As triglycerides from VLDL are deposited into the cells of tissues, it becomes an IDL particle.

(IDL) Intermediate Density Lipoprotein are either recycled by the liver, or deposit more lipids and become LDL particles.

(LDL) Low Density Lipoprotein, or the so called “bad cholesterol”, has the role of transferring the relatively large amount of cholesterol and cholesterol esters to peripheral tissues. There are varying sizes of LDL particles, and only the smaller, denser LDL particles have been associated with heart disease.

(HDL) High Density Lipoprotein, often called “good cholesterol”, carries excess cholesterol from cells back to the liver, to be metabolized into bile acids and salts.

Together, HDL and LDL maintain the cholesterol balance of the body, with LDL transferring cholesterol to cells, and HDL carrying cholesterol from cells.

The image below demonstrates the differences between small and large LDL particles, and shows the metabolism of lipoprotein particles in general as well. (LPL stands for lipoprotein lipase, an enzyme which hydrolyzes lipids in lipoproteins)

Sunday, July 4, 2010

Sun Exposure - Why you SHOULDN'T slather on the sunscreen


Dr. Michael Eades posted some excellent articles on the ridiculousness of most dermatologists recommendations about sun exposure nowadays. Many dermatologists will recommend you wear sunscreen when you go out into the sun for a long period of time. However, the large majority of the population has been shown to be significantly vitamin D deficient, a deficiency which has been linked to increased breast, colon, and prostate cancer. Here are the articles, I highly recommend you read them, and then go enjoy the sunshine we should be getting the rest of the week!

Sunshine Superman

Heliophobe Madness

Friday, July 2, 2010

The cover of "The Paleolithic Solution" has been finalized!


Robb Wolf''s book is due out in September, and I HIGHLY recommend you buy multiple copies! This book is going to be an incredibly intelligent and thorough guide to diet, as well as training!

Monday, June 28, 2010

Freedom

  "The secret of happiness is freedom.  The secret of freedom is courage." ~Thucydides
"In this country we are very lucky.  Sure we all bitch and complain about the powers that be, which in my opinion is warranted, but bottom line is we are very very lucky.  We all have the freedom to do as we please.  To be who we want to be, to say what we want to say, and to become whatever we want to be.  Sure there are always obstacles to surmount but those are mostly in our heads.  Every person in this country..."

Tuesday, June 22, 2010

Nutrition Series: The Basics - Cholesterol

It's finally here! Sorry this one took so long guys, but I had to do a lot of researching on some subjects on my own to get a better understanding of them before writing.

THE BASICS - CHOLESTEROL

Cholesterol is a waxy lipid that acts as the starting material for the production of steroid hormones, bile acids and salts, and vitamin D synthesis. It also is an important molecule used for the repair and maintenance of cell membranes, where it helps maintain membrane fluidity.

Hormones are very important chemicals in our bodies, altogether they form a system of intercellular communication. Hormones are very powerful, and required only in small amounts to induce their effects on the targeted area. Hormones regulate everything from digestion to electrolyte levels, to brain function, to tissue repair or breakdown, and everything in between; hormones are how the complex system of organs and tissues that is our body communicates and functions properly.
(Above - the pathways for synthesis of some important steroid hormones)

Steroid hormones include: glucocorticoids, mineralocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, and progestagens.

Glucocorticoids are hormones, secreted in the adrenal cortex, and have two main areas of influence, the immune system and metabolism, but they also play a role in arousal/cognition, and fetal development. Their effects on the immune system include an up-regulation of anti-inflammatory proteins, and a down-regulation of pro-inflammatory proteins. The net effect is a reduction in inflammation. Glucocorticoids have a catabolic effect on the body’s metabolism, which means that rather than storing energy, tissues are broken down to be used for energy. The specific mechanisms glucocorticoids stimulate are: increased gluconeogenesis, mobilization of amino acids from extrahepatic(other than liver) tissues, inhibition of glucose uptake by muscle and adipose tissue, and stimulation of fat breakdown(lipolysis). The most important glucocorticoid is cortisol.

Mineralocorticoids regulate electrolyte and water balance in the body primarily by acting on the kidneys. The primary mineralocorticoid is aldosterone, though progesterone and deoxycorticosterone also exhibit mineralocorticoid effects.

Androgens are generally known as the male sex hormones, in that they stimulate the development of male characteristics. They still do appear in females, but to a much lesser degree. The particularly well known androgens include testosterone and dihydrotestosterone(DHT).

Estrogens are steroid hormones that stimulate the development of feminine characteristics, as well as play an important role in regulating the estrous cycle. They are created by enzymes that convert androgens to estrogens. The primary estrogens in women are estradiol(most present in non-pregnant females), estriol(produced during pregnancy), and estrone(produced during menopause).
Progestagens, along with estrogens, act to regulate the menstrual cycle and estrous cycles.

Bile salts and acids are produced by the liver and stored in the gall bladder. The term bile salt refers to a molecule that is composed of a bile acid and either glycine or taurine. Their main function is to facilitate the formation of micelles, which helps the body process dietary fat. Because fat and water do not mix, micelles are necessary for lipids and fat-soluble vitamins to dissolve in aqueous(water based) solutions.
(Above - cross-sectional view of structures that can be formed by phospholipids in an aqueous solution)

Vitamin D3(cholecalciferol) synthesis occurs in the skin, where 7-dehydrocholesterol is converted into cholecalciferol. Cholecalciferol is then carried through the blood to the liver, where it is converted to calcidiol, which in turn may be converted to calcitriol(the active form of vitamin D) by monocyte-macrophages or the kidneys.

The repair and maintenance of cell membranes requires cholesterol. Cholesterol typically makes up about 20% of the mass of the cellular membranes, with smaller amounts included in the organelles inside of cells. Cholesterol lends some structure to cell membranes, allowing them a certain degree of rigidity. Without cholesterol, the membrane would be much too fluid, and would be much too permeable to certain molecules. In addition to providing structure to cell membranes, cholesterol also keeps them fluid, by helping to separate phospholipids and keeping fatty acid chains from merging and crystallizing.
Lipid raft organisation, region (1) is standard lipid bilayer, while region (2) is a lipid raft.

Cholesterol,  along with sphingolipids, also plays an important role in anchoring functional proteins in the cell membrane. These two substances form lipid rafts, These proteins perform many functions such as controlling the travel of substances in and out of cells, attaching to other cells, communicating with other cells, or responding to hormones from other cells. Lipid rafts form a more solid area in which these proteins reside.

Thursday, June 17, 2010

Nutrition Series: The Basics - Lipids

Here's the third part in the ongoing Nutrition Series! I realize there are a lot of links contained in each article, and these can help, but are not required, to further your understanding of the material. I encourage you to click on the links whenever slightly curious, they contain interesting and pertinent information relating to the information being presented. Enjoy!

THE BASICS - LIPIDS

Lipids include a variety of molecules that are either hydrophobic(water fearing - these molecules repel water) or amphiphilic(both water and lipid loving - these typically have both a hydrophilic side and a lipophilic side). Lipids include a broad range of molecules, but the groups that are most pertinent to the discussion of nutrition are triglycerides.
triglyceride molecule is composed of three fatty acid chains connected to a glycerol molecule. Triglycerides make up the majority of animal fats as well as vegetable oils.
(A saturated fatty acid, myristic acid, notice the lack of double bonds)
(A monounsaturated fatty acid, oleic acid, notice the single double bond that creates the bent shape)
Fatty acids are characterized as either saturated or unsaturated, based on the presence of double bonds in their structure. If the molecule contains no double bonds it is said to be saturated, otherwise it is unsaturated to some degree. Double bonds reduce the number of hydrogens on each carbon. These different structures provide different chemical properties such as melting point, lipid peroxidation potential, etc. In general, the more double bonds(the more unsaturated) a fat has, the greater its tendency to oxidize and the lower its melting point.
Lipid peroxidation is the oxidative degradation of lipids, and results in a chain reaction that continues creating free fatty acid radicals until either two radicals meet, or the cycle is terminated by an anti-oxidant. Free fatty acid radicals can cause significant damage to cell membranes, as well as create end products that may be mutagenic and carcinogenic.
Saturated Fatty Acids(SFA) - These fatty acids contain no double bonds, and as such are fully saturated with hydrogen. Saturated fats have a relatively high melting point, and are resistant to oxidation, making them preferable for high-heat cooking. SFA’s include: Lauric acid, Myristic acid, Palmitic acid, Stearic acid, and Archidic acid. Saturated fats are solid at room temperature.
(above is shown the change that occurs during hydrogenation of a MUFA to a trans fat)
Trans-Fatty Acids(TFA) - These unsaturated fats with the characteristic “trans” configuration. Trans-fatty acids include both natural and artificial fatty acids. The two natural trans fats, found mostly in grass-fed beef and dairy, are Vaccenic acid and Conjugated Linoleic acids(CLA). These two fats are highly anti-carcinogenic(against cancer), in fact, CLA(specifically rumenic acid) is one of the most potent anti-cancer compounds known to man. Vaccenic acid is converted to rumenic acid by enzymes within the body. These two fats also have antiatherogenic(against atherosclerosis) effects, and positive effects on body composition. Artificial fatty acids, such as Elaidic acid are created by the process of partial hydrogenation, and have been associated with cancer, heart disease, and a myriad of other negative effects. Artificially created trans fats are solid, but malleable, at room temperature.
Monounsaturated Fatty Acids(MUFA) - these fats contain a single double bond, and have a higher melting point than polyunsaturated fats(PUFA), but a lower melting point than saturated fats. Likewise, they have a lipid peroxidation potential in between PUFA’s and SFA’s. Oleic acid is the most prominent MUFA found in olive oil and also in human adipose tissue. These fats are considered generally healthy. At room temperature, these fats are liquid, but they will solidify at refrigerator temperatures.
Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids(PUFA) are those that contain 2 or more double bonds. These fats have the lowest melting point, and are the most susceptible to lipid peroxidation. They are liquid even at below 0°C. The main types of PUFA are omega-3’s and omega-6’s, but there are also some PUFA’s in the Omega-9 fatty acid group. Both omega-3's and omega-6's are essential fats, and must be obtained in sufficient amounts through our diet. The omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in our diet influence the level of inflammation in our body by their effect in the production of eicosanoids. Eicosanoids are signaling molecules that are made from omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, and they play a large role in regulating inflammation and immunity.
Important Omega-3 fatty acids include: Alpha Linoleic acid(ALA), Eicosapentaenoic acid(EPA), and Docosahexaenoic acid(DHA). Omega-3 fatty acids tend to produce less inflammatory eicosanoids than omega-6’s do. It should be noted that EPA and DHA are the active forms in which our body uses omega-3’s, and conversion from ALA to EPA and DHA is very inefficient (~5% for EPA); EPA and DHA can interconvert. Some rich sources of these fatty acids include: flax seed oil(ALA), fatty fish(EPA/DHA), and algae(DHA). Below is a diagram of both omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid structures.
Important Omega-6 fatty acids include: Linoleic acid (LA) and Arachidonic acid(AA), . Omega-6’s tend to produce more inflammatory eicosanoids than omega-3’s do.  Some rich sources of these fatty acids include: Grains, seeds, nuts, grain-fed meat, and vegetable oils. However, Gamma Linolenic acid(GLA) and Dihomo-Gamma-Linolenic acid(DGLA) play a role in reducing inflammation. Borage oil, primrose oil, spirulina, and hemp seed oil are good sources of GLA.

CHANGE OF ADDRESS

Important! The address of this blog will be changing soon, probably to "www.huskycfclub.blogspot.com". I'll keep you guys updated on facebook.

Tuesday, June 15, 2010

Nutrition Series: The Basics - Amino Acids, Proteins, and Enzymes

(pictured is a space-filling model of myoglobin, a protein found in muscle tissue)


THE BASICS - AMINO ACIDS, PROTEINS, AND ENZYMES

Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. They connect to each other in long chains to form proteins, which take the form of very complex shapes, with many bends and folds.
There are 22 amino acids that comprise the proteins in our cells.
These can be subdivided into
Essential/non-essential - there are 8 amino acids considered essential, in that they can not be produced by our bodies and must be obtained through the diet. However, certain essential amino acids can be synthesized from certain non-essential ones. Also, in certain populations, non-essential amino acids become essential because of some type of disease or disorder; these amino acids are considered conditionally essential.
Essential Amino Acids: Isoleucine, Leucine, Lysine, Methionine, Phenylalanine, Threonine, Tryptophan, and Valine
Non-essential: Alanine, Aspartate(aka aspartic acid), Glutamate(aka glutamic acid), Pyrrolysine*, Selenocysteine* (*unclassified)
Conditionally Essential: Histidine, Tyrosine, Arginine, Cysteine, Glutamine, Glycine, Proline, Serine, and Asparagine.
Amino acids can also be characterized as either glucogenic, ketogenic or both. Glucogenic describes those amino acids that can be converted to glucose through gluconeogenesis. Ketogenic amino acids are those that can produce ketones through the process of ketogenesis
Glucogenic Amino Acids: Glycine, Serine, Valine, Histidine, Arginine, Cysteine, Proline, Alanine, Glutamate, Glutamine, Aspartate, Asparagine, and Methionine.
Both glucogenic or ketogenic: Isoleucine, Threonine, Phenylalanine, Tyrosine, and Tryptophan.
Ketogenic Amino Acids: Leucine and Lysine.
Enzymes are proteins that catalyze(or increase the rate of) chemical reactions. Most enzyme reaction rates are millions of times faster than comparable un-catalyzed rates.

Sunday, June 13, 2010

Nutrition Series: The Basics - Carbohydrates


Hi guys, over the next few months, I will be going through a nutrition series that will hopefully cover much of the important stuff in nutrition. I will be basing the format on Mat Lalonde's lecture, explaining it, and adding to/modifying it where needed. We'll begin with the basics, going over the fundamentals of nutritional science, and next we'll get into two theories of nutrition: the fat hypothesis and the carbohydrate hypothesis. Let's get started!

THE BASICS - CARBOHYDRATES

There are two basic categories of nutrients: macronutrients, and micronutrients. Macronutrients are further categorized into carbohydrate, protein, and fat and are what our body derives energy from. Micronutrients are what we know as vitamins and minerals and do not supply any calories.
Essential nutrients are substances which are required by for normal body functioning, but which can not be synthesized by the body at all, or in sufficient amounts, and thus must be obtained from the diet. Essential nutrients include: vitamins, minerals, essential fatty acids, and essential amino acids. Oxygen and water are also required.
Non-essential nutrients are those that are not required to obtain through diet, but that may have significant impact on health status. Carbohydrates, dietary fiber, and phytochemicals fit into this category. There is no such thing as an essential carbohydrate, the body can synthesize carbohydrates as needed in the body through a process called gluconeogenesis(this will be discussed in a later post). Dietary fiber may be beneficial in the digestive process, and phytochemicals are being increasingly looked at for treating various ailments and for their other health benefits.
Carbohydrates are what we commonly refer to as sugars and are generally divided into 4 categories: Monosaccharides, Disaccharides, Oligosaccharides, and Polysaccharides.
A monosaccharide is a single isolated carbohydrate molecule, that is not linked to any other carbohydrate. They are often referred to as simple sugars. Examples include: glucose, fructose, galactose, xylose, and ribose. 
A disaccharide is two carbohydrate molecules linked by a glycosidic bond. Some common examples are sucrose(glucose+fructose; also known as table sugar), lactose (glucose+galactose; found in milk), and maltose (glucose+glucose; commonly formed when brewing alcohol).
Oligosaccharides generally contain anywhere from 3 to 9 carbohydrate molecules, though the exact number at which it should be called a polysaccharide really doesn’t matter. Oligosaccharides can only be partially digested by humans, and play a role in maintaining gut flora, which is why they are commonly used as prebiotics. The two common oligosaccharides used as prebiotics are: fructooligosaccharides (FOS) and inulin. FOS are found in various vegetables and fruits, but is found in highest concentrations in the Jerusalem artichoke. Inulin is found in many of the same plants as FOS, but is not found in fruit to a large extent.
Polysaccharides are chains of carbohydrate molecules composed of 10 or more monosaccharides. Common examples include storage forms such as starches and glycogen, as well as structural forms like cellulose (aka insoluble fiber). Starch is composed of long chains of glucose molecules, and are the found in all plants, albeit with radically varying degrees of carbohydrate density. Glycogen is the storage form of carbohydrate in animals, and is stored mainly in the liver and muscles, and to a very small extent, in the kidneys.

Friday, June 11, 2010

The Paleo Diet Newsletter

Hey guys, recently, I've been receiving some very interesting and pertinent information about the consumption of nightshades, which includes various plants such as potatoes, peppers, tomatoes, and eggplant. I've been receiving this free of charge from The Paleo Diet Newsletter, by Loren Cordain, one of the foremost experts on the paleo diet. I highly recommend you guys subscribe to his weekly newsletter. It's free, and there are often quite interesting articles sent out. Sometime in the future, I'll write up a piece on nightshades, combining the information from Dr. Cordain's article, as well as knowledge from the Nutrition Seminar with Mathieu Lalonde. I would also highly recommend Mat Lalonde's seminar, for those of you who would like to get into the finer details, as well as those who simply want a good basic understanding of why the paleo diet works so well.

Tuesday, June 8, 2010

Vitamin D

Tuesday WOD

10 rounds for time of:
5 Tire Flips
100m Run

Post times to comments.

Sunday, June 6, 2010

Monday WOD


WOD
"Fran"
21-15-9 for time of:
95lb Thrusters
Pullups


Well guys, this is it! Finals week! We'll be training on Monday and Tuesday, but I'm leaving for the summer on Wednesday. Good luck with all of your final exams!

Saturday, June 5, 2010

Sports Drinks - The Good, The Bad, and The Sugar



Sports Drinks
Sports drinks are used in athletics at almost any level in an effort to replace carbohydrate, electrolytes and other nutrients, and generally come in three varieties : Isotonic, Hypertonic, and Hypotonic. Isotonic drinks, the most common, have concentrations of electrolytes and sugar at levels found in the body, whereas hypertonic and hypotonic have levels above and below, respectively.


Sports drinks can be useful for preventing water intoxication, which occurs when too much water is consumed and the electrolyte concentration of the blood drops. This is a potentially lethal condition, but it takes very large amounts to reach dangerous levels.


New research has also revealed a bit about how our brain keeps a throttle on how hard we can push. After bicycling to exhaustion, participants in the study were given a mouthful of a sugar or artificially sweetened solution then spat it out. Compared to controls, they were able to ride for quite a bit further immediately. It seems as though the brain may limit energy output by what the body's perceived energy status is. Sports drinks may have a place in reducing fatigue during exercise.


There are however some inaccuracies about sports drinks that need to be addressed. The claim that they prevent cramps by way of electrolyte replenishment is not substantiated by science. In fact, this review of the studies looking at cramps in runners found no connection between cramping and electrolyte status. They concluded that neurological changes associated with fatigue and often over-reaching by athletes may be a more likely cause.


The requirements of athletes differs greatly by sport, and not all athletes will benefit from sports drinks during competition. Sports drinks should only be used during competition or very hard training for athletes in glycogen dependent sports. Regular use of sports drinks outside of these scenarios can lead to insulin resistance, fat gain, and other manifestations of metabolic derangement. Athletes that perform in relatively high intensity sports for long or medium duration may require more carbohydrate to fuel training than pure endurance or strength athletes. Rather than sports drinks though, they should strive to consume their carbohydrate in the form of nutrient and antioxidant dense sources like yams, sweet potatoes, other root vegetables and squash. Even these athletes will likely do well with carbohydrate comprising 40% or less of their caloric intake. They will do better to keep carbohydrate levels moderate, then very low 5 days out from competition, then carb-load the last 2 days before competition, resulting in extremely full glycogen stores.


Strength athletes have relatively little need for full glycogen stores, and so do not need sports drinks, though protein shakes MAY be of some benefit. Ultra-endurance athletes will do best to be fat adapted, and so may benefit from a relatively low carbohydrate diet, except in the few days prior to competition. Sports drinks can benefit your performance in competition, but use them sparingly, as the costs often outweigh the benefits.

Wednesday, June 2, 2010

Thursday WOD

WOD

AMRAP in 10 min of:
200m Row
10 Pushups
20 Pullups

Post rounds completed to comments.

Tuesday, June 1, 2010

Wednesday WOD - Bacteria can make you smarter and happier?

WOD

Back Squat:
5 reps at 65% max
3 reps at 75% max
1+ rep at 85% max

2 X 10 Overhead Lunges
2 X 10 Front Squat
2 X 10 Overhead Squat

For the 1+, complete as many reps as you can for that weight.
Post loads and reps completed to comments.

A recent study done on rats shows that certain bacteria can actually influence the brain and make us smarter and happier. These bacteria, naturally occurring in the soil and carried through the air, can improve cognition and mood, another great reason to get out and enjoy nature in the great state of Washington!
http://news.discovery.com/human/can-bacteria-make-you-smarter.html

Monday, May 31, 2010

Tuesday WOD

WOD (depending on the weather...)
5 rounds for time:
5 Clean and Jerks (155/105#)
10 Burpees
or
5 rounds for time:
5 Tire Flip (large tire)
10 Burpees

If it's nice, we'll all meet at the regular place, then head out to the field behind Husky Stadium.

Sunday, May 30, 2010

The Butterfly Kip

Here's a nice explanation of the Butterfly Kipping Pullup from Chris Spealler at CrossFit Park City.

Saturday, May 29, 2010

Monday - No Class

Class is canceled for Monday, so enjoy your three-day weekend, and we'll hit it on Tuesday.

Wednesday, May 26, 2010

Thursday WOD

WOD
5 rounds for time of:
5 Overhead Squats (95/65#)
10 Overhead Lunges (95/65#)
15 Shoulder-to-Overhead (95/65#)

Post times to comments.

Tuesday, May 25, 2010

Wednesday WOD - NSAIDs Effects on Soft Tissue Recovery

WOD
5, 5, 5, 5, 5 Back Squat
3 X AMRAP Strict Pullups

Post loads and reps to comments.

NSAIDs Effects on Soft Tissue Recovery
NSAIDs, or Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs, are commonly used to reduce pain and inflammation associated with sports injuries and also often as fever reducers. They generally work by reducing prostaglandin synthesis, and thus lowering inflammation. Some common NSAIDs are aspirin, naproxen(Aleve), and ibuprofen(Advil, Motrin).
NSAIDs should NOT be used for injuries however, and knowledgeable sports medicine physicians know this, because of their dramatic effects on tissue healing. NSAIDs stop the inflammatory healing process required for wounds to heal and studies have shown this effect is dramatic. In one study mentioned in the link below, the breaking strength of a tendons treated with an NSAID was only 30% of that of the control group's tendons not treated with NSAIDs 6 weeks after injury. Other studies have found similar results with ibuprofen, showing a 300% DECREASE in tendon strength at four weeks. You can read up more on this by clicking on the link below:
NSAIDs Hamper Ligament and Tendon Healing
NSAIDs also shouldn't be used for delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS) for the same reason, they stop the repair process, and have actually been banned in some Eastern European countries' sports programs because they halt the adaptation process that occurs from training.
Instead, for acute treatment of injuries, ice for 20 minute intervals, with at least 20 min in between(don't use heat for at least the first 3 days) and rest the injured area for a day or so. Then, depending on the severity of the injury, start adding movement to mobilize the tissues again and start building strength back into it. Start back slowly, but START, don't think an ankle sprain gives you a free ride to lay in bed for a week. Get back in the gym and either work on other weaknesses you have or work on strengthening and helping recover the injured area, preferably both.

Monday, May 24, 2010

Tuesday WOD - NW Regional Women's Competition Video

WOD
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 for time of:
Toes To Bar
Pullups
1 trip of  60' Sled Push @ Bodyweight each round

Completely different WOD than yesterday's crusher, so you guys should be fine! Awesome job on the Hotel WOD, it was brutal, but you guys really pushed it!

Also, you guys should check out the NW Regional Women's Competition! Rory did a great job, took 9th overall, and is featured quite a few times in the video. The men's competition video is likely coming soon.

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Monday WOD

WOD (see link below)
For time:
100 DB Power clean and thrusters (35lb DB's)
5 Burpees every minute on the minute

WOD Video

Post times to comments.

Wednesday, May 19, 2010

Thursday WOD

WOD
For Time:
20 Push Jerks (185/125lbs)
40 Burpees



Post times to comments

Tuesday, May 18, 2010

Wednesday WOD - Ketosis: What is it and how does it work?

WOD
"CrossFit Total"
1 rep Squat max, 3 attempts
1 rep Press max, 3 attempts
1 rep Deadlift max, 3 attempts

Warm up to the weight first, then attempt your maxes. Post loads to comments.

Ketosis: What is it and how does it work?
Ketosis is a state in which your body produces chemicals called ketones, which are an alternative fuel source to glucose for many bodily tissues. Typically this occurs during starvation, when the body uses gluconeogenesis to convert muscle tissue protein to glucose in the liver, in the body's effort to save muscle tissue. By substituting ketones, which are made from fat, for glucose in fueling much of the body's systems, there is less of a need to convert muscle protein into glucose, thereby preserving muscle mass.
Ketosis has also been shown as a possible treatment for cancer, because cancer cells cannot metabolize ketones as well for energy as the rest of the body, they need glucose. Ketogenic diets have shown promise for slowing, stopping and even reversing the growth of tumors.
Dr. Michael Eades has written an excellent post drawing out how ketosis works in better detail and why it is the best state to be in if you want to lose fat while preserving muscle mass. He also provides instructions on how to use ketosis to your advantage. In the second post, Dr. Eades explains how ketosis helps our cells clear out cellular debris, helping to prevent the buildups of junk proteins within cells, which is a  contributing factor to aging.
Metabolism and Ketosis
Ketosis Cleans Our Cells
Here is a paper from Nutrition and Metabolism showing that low-carb diets do not necessarily reduce performance in athletes.
Ketogenic Diets and Physical Peformance

Tuesday WOD

WOD
"Annie"
50-40-30-20-10 for time of:
Double-unders (or 3X singles)
Situps

Post times to comments.

Monday, May 17, 2010

*IMPORTANT*

In my class on Evolutionary Medicine today, we acquired limited time access to some great videos and lectures. I've found two lectures on the Paleolithic Diet by Professor Boyd Eaton, one of the more knowledgeable people on the subject of nutrition and our ancestral past. I'd like you to watch one or both of them, they're very informative and will give you a very coherent idea of why many CrossFit athletes eat a Paleo/Primal diet. It's a very limited time deal, so watch them as soon as possible, I don't know if they'll be available tomorrow! Username: Washington
Password: member
Here are the links to the pages:
http://hstalks.com/main/browse_talk_info.php?talk_id=142&series_id=20&c=252
http://hstalks.com/main/browse_talk_info.php?talk_id=142&series_id=20&c=252

P.S. After watching the first and part of the second, I've realized that these are almost the same video at the beginning, so feel free to skip until you find the new material in the second video.